Fairyfly at the Helipad.

Wildlife in the Country Park takes many and varied forms, some are easier to see than others. The most challenging thus far is a wasp. It was found in long grass at the helipad and is a parasitoid of a species of weevil and a cranefly. At just under 0.5mm long it is difficult to be certain of the identification, but Anaphes regulus of the Mymaridae is the most likely. The Mymaridae family of wasps are commonly known as Fairyflies owing to their tiny size and remarkable fringed wings. They are the only family of parasitoid wasps to have a common name.

 

Advertisements

Turtle Bug on the Firehills.

Bare patches in the former hedgeline on the Firehills provide a relatively sheltered warm microclimate that is a degree or two higher than the surrounding area. Consequently these bare areas are always worth a close look when seeking insects as so many are more active at higher temperatures since they live at the northern edge of their range in this country. A recent visit found a Turtle Shieldbug Podops inuncta. This species is not uncommon, yet it is infrequently found since its colouration blends so well with the soil and it is a ground dwelling species. It has not been previously recorded in the Country Park, nor in the local area. It has another common name, the Knobbed Shieldbug referencing those peculiar protuberances at the shoulder.

The new Shannon 13-28

I could not resist posting a photo of Hastings’ new Shannon class lifeboat the Richard and Caroline Colton out on exercise about 0.5 nautical miles off the Firehills yesterday one of a series of exercises this week. A bit of a grey day and I hope for a clearer photo sometime soon.

Another New Species For The Country Park.

Hunting through parched grass in the quarry in the hope of finding interesting insects, a wasp of a  new family was found. The family is Bethylidae, and the wasp is Epyris niger. It was entirely black, approximately 4mm long, and had a prognathous head. Microscope examination proved it to be a most interesting insect that is evidently quite a serious predator. It has a powerful sting to disable larvae of lepidoptera and coleoptera which are then dragged away – eggs are laid on the prey. This is another new species to add to the ever-growing list for the Country Park.

  

A Trojan in the Country Park?

No this is nothing to do with internet malware! It is a reference to the Shakespeare play Troilus and Cressida. Today’s new record for the Country Park (and for me) is Troilus luridus aka Bronze Shieldbug. This is a predatory shieldbug which preys on a variety of other insects. My find is a final instar nymph which is possibly the most striking phase of it’s life cycle. The contrast between the green, white and metallic bronze is an amazing sight!

Another new Country Park record

On Monday I was sent a photo by a regular dog walker at the Country Park of a beetle. I was able to identify it as a Violet Ground Beetle, Carabus violaceus, which I have not seen before at the Country Park and consulting online records and another regular recorder at the Country Park who specialises in entymology (insects), there are no previous records. So this must be another first record for the Country Park. This beetle is possibly under recorded as it hunts at night for slugs, worms and other insects and by day is invariably lurking under a stone.